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20121222
20121230
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CSPAN 6
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of that the booty of $15-$16,000 more. for what? this is just an extra fee and extra goodies per container. what this was back in the '60s was a way to help there be more workers, it was a deal done with the unions and the ports so they wouldn't use as much equipment and so they wouldn't be as efficient so they could keep their union workers. it's outdated, and it's wrong and, really, it's terrible -- gregg: julie, what do you think? >> i think if we're talking about smoot-holly which is a different issue just raised by didi, but, yeah, i think the president will probably intervene, and he did last time on the west co
of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which he said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. there are two separate propositions that are pertinent to any consideration of the
begins, it's late july, 1992, and i'm on a flight from washington, d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill, and one of my regrets of the summer was that i'd never seen strom thurmond. because all my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him. i did know what they meant really your but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and a look ahead in front of me and i see a man who's got kind of orange colored hair practically, so brightly colored. first generation hair plugs. shows you how slow i am that i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. then, of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that when people reaching over trying to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i'd been in d.c. that summer for the first time, and i met all of these politicians i've seen a tv. i was about to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them all about the famous people i met up in washington, d.c. and so i was going to try to shake his ha
. [video clip] >> we took that vote back on july 25. it did not originate in the house. it has no chance of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is fo
stonewall talks in july. speaking reuters, an nra spokesperson said the massacre in newtown, connecticut will not change their opposition to the treaty saying, "we are as opposed to it today as we were when it first appeared." the nra has vowed to oppose global arms regulation marking its second major policy announcement in the past week after responding to the newtown massacre with the karl for armed guards and by u.s. schools. some 200 teachers and utah attended a seminar sponsored by the pro-gun utah shooting sports council for free trading on the handling of firearms. new figures show publicly known u.s. drone strikes declined in pakistan this year while drastically increasing in yemen. according to the new america foundation, confirmed drone attacks fell to 46 from 72 in pakistan, while rising to 53 from 18 in yemen. the u.s. just recently admitted responsibility for a september attack in yemen that killed 11 civilians, including three children. rebels of the central african republic appeared to be on the verge of seizing control of the capital after taking at least 10 other towns.
in this rain. >> i will even hide the book. [inaudible conversations] [laughter] >> julie. >> how are you? good to see you. how if web you been? >> i've been well. how about you? >> here i am. >> it's so good to see you. .. >> can i get a picture with you, to require? is one of those roaming errors. it's a brand-new day. okay, get in here. don hardy. >> this is one of my students. this is one of my finest students. he is of the face. >> i'm in the white house now. [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> that's how project sessions start. >> it's you, margaret. >> it's me, margaret. [inaudible] >> wow. >> his mother was judge alice k. birdie, big democrat with 13 children. i voice, for gross. >> i wish i could've been your author. >> used to take the whole staff over. >> my goodness. >> we are all here. >> you remember my wife, sir. >> good to see you off. [inaudible conversations] >> how are you doing? >> they have a copy yet. >> we were together at treasury, so they get together every once in a while and trade stories. [inaudible] >> the guy with the radio. [laughter] >> they don't know your
the in"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, both in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which she said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unali
was turning out to be really hard. july 1776 by december had turned into a editor, painful, depressive, demoralizing series. in washington rewrite a pamphlet called the crisis, which begins these are the times. washington understood the first you win the argument menu in the word. people had to believe. i came here to say to you, we have no reason to despair. you have no reason to back off. you have no reason. we have every reason to behave this parents. any questions? [applause] [applause] >> said the speaker has been kind enough to give us an temper questions than answers. if you have one come raise your hand. if you could wait to leak at the in your hand, so everyone can hear it, that would be great. we will start over here. >> first of all, mr. speaker, i'd like to congratulate you in thank you for coming out and be demanded to read that his willing to fight the good fight. we appreciate that. [applause] and i agree with you that we have also her, we've lost the battle we have to continue to pay. some of the things we should all think about going forward is a need to make sure the
"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, dwight eisenhower proclaimed the fourth of july a national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, golfed in the afternoon, and played ridge in the evening. -- bridge in the evening. perhaps there were prayers in the us activities. -- these activities. this was not his first foray into the ground between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president-elect ike made a speech in which he said, quo"our form of government haso sense unless it is founded in the deeply fought religious space, and i do not care what it is your cu." he received much ridicule for the last part of his statement. for expressing indifference to the religion. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly, many americans, perhaps a majority of them, agree that democracy, at least our democracy, which is based on the belief in natural rights presupposes a religious faith. people who believe this, as eisenhower did, the declaration of independence, and the proposition tha
we have for advertising and push it forward into june and july to define him in the battleground states. other candidates, bill clinton in $100 million we have for 1996, did the same thing. this was a real gamble. but it really paid off. the romney folks are never able to recover. the definition that the obama people had established with the dominant one in the campaign. host: this is from "the boston sunday globe." two days before election day and then the piece goes on to say, looking back, to your point, the candidate never defining himself. and then overestimating his ground game. on the ground game side, they were worth about their own bravado about their own organization. part of it was, i think, a genuine ignorance about what president obama had going on. the romney campaign had a triple a round game. obama campaigned out a ground game that was led the 1927 yankees. it was up against a perhaps all- time great ground game. i do not think the romney folks appreciated that. a lot of the post-mortem pieces that we have done, talking about the obama ground game -- part of it is
card. u.s. be rambling the ears. >> come al west again. around july 4th. >> let us know. give us notice. a lot of people com. sometimes i look at the driveway and then go into the basement. anybody in there? [laughter] >> i've done that. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank-you for all your work. we need people like you. >> when needed. >> thank you. it's great. it's great to see you. >> you'd like to get out here. [inaudible conversations] >> easier. the word in this same year. let's get going. [applause] one. >> good evening, everyone. i didn't hear you. hi. i am thrilled to welcome you to this special evening for a very dear friend. ethier at this fabulous hotel, the jefferson, i would like to introduce you to peter grossman, one of our co-hosts. will you come and say hello. [applause] >> thank you. just very briefly on behalf of connie it's an absolute thrill to be hosting senator simpson and his former chief of staff and biographer this evening. we are excited. shooting from the li
including the latest crash involving a bullet train which killed 40 people. remember that? july. patti ann: well, anxiety is rising over big tax hikes and spending cuts set to kick in on january 1st. a growing number of lawmakers saying they are skeptical that a deal can be reached in five days to avoid the fiscal cliff, especially with the main sticking point coming down to whether to increase taxes for top earners next year among many other things. byron york, now, of "the washington examiner" joins us to talk about this. good morning, byron. >> good morning, patti ann. patti ann: so we're going to show a full scream of what would happen if -- full screen of what would happen if we go off that fiscal cliff. but you got democrats, including congressman john yarmouth of kentucky, saying, look, we may go off that cliff on january 1st, but we would creak it very quickly -- correct it very quickly thereafter, so do you believe that's the democratic plan? enter yes, and it's a republican nightmare. republicans have been reached no deal's reached, barack obama and democrats immediately propose
. number eight, summer heat wave. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfires. >> smoke in the air. >> the heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that hit the west. number six, the deratio in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it took a fast moving long lasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there is an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. april 3rd proved otherwise when twisters hit dallas. >> scary. it was so scary. it reminds you of the wizard of oz when the tornado hit and everything just going around and around. >> 22 tornadoes caused a billion dollars worth of damage in 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornado. tornadoes took up three spots in our top ten countdown, but this event was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 40 people in the midwest. number three, hurricane isaac. hurric
that this past july. beautiful experience. >> juliet: and what is your next climb going to be, young man? >> the next climb is january 12 to the 17. we're going up to mount washington to do ice climbing. >> kelly: oh, wow. >> juliet: i have to ask you, we sit here and we complain over our lives sometimes when we have everything and we are able-bodies, we've got our legs. what is it about you that makes you able to be so strong and have such a -- so brave and so positive? >> you know, i believe that i could have handled the situation either way. i could be absolutely miserable or i could be positive and try to help. just like i said before, i was given that second chance and it's kept me positive and all i want to do is be able to help out these families. >> kelly: keith, god bless you and thank you for your service to this country. >> juliet: yes, thank you. >> kelly: you make us all very proud and to donate no the special warriors foundation, go to what we're going to show you righto to our web site. you are a remarkable man. god bless you. >> juliet: let us know how it all goes. >> abs
the mood. you could use this in july. this bowl to me is so beautiful. this is from zee gallery. this is under $100. this would look great anywhere in your house. when you combine it with this beautiful runner, and i took these westhome vases and dressed them up with tulips. these are from a supermarket. if you take a whole bunch, again, more is more. put them in there. it's the unexpected. it makes it look just fun and festive. >> this looks very spring here too. >> it does. or it could be, you know, again for new year's, any time of the year. >> very fresh. >> it's combining the unexpected to make it festive and fun. >> okay. last but not least, this is table that keeps giving. >> this keeps on giving. i think it's fun to have the center piece also be gifts for guests. so the first thing i thought it for the host memento, this is a monogrammed tray. it says happy 2013. >> this can be there year round. >> exactly. fun to have a bunch of them. this can be in your center. then i love the idea of these mint julip cups. i monogram them for each guest. they don't have to be. filling
of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. to see how money is cspent, and to control how it should be
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)